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Written by Megan Finnegan Bungeroth on . Posted in News Our Town, Notes from the Neighborhood, Our Town.


By Megan Bungeroth & Amanda Woods

Singing the Garbage Away
A local group opposing the East 91st Street Marine Transfer Station is holding a free community concert to raise awareness for their cause and protest the proposed MTS. Residents for Sane Trash Solutions is sponsoring the event, called “Dump the Dump,” Friday, June 5 from 5-7 p.m. at the Asphalt Green Field on East 90th Street and York Avenue—right by the proposed station. The concert will feature musical acts Caroline Sunshine, Upper West and local talent, including neighborhood kids. The first 1,000 attendees get a free T-shirt, presumably one that declares the wearer’s opposition to the MTS. Gates open at 4:30 p.m.

Free Adult Computer Classes
Upper East Side residents will have the opportunity to brush up on their computer skills this summer at the 67th Street Branch of the New York Public Library. The branch will hold free adult computer classes throughout June and July. June classes include computer basics (June 5, 5:30-6:30 p.m., and June 7, 2-3 p.m.), mouse and keyboarding skills (June 12, 5:30-6:30 p.m., and June 14, 2-3 p.m.), basic Internet search (June 19, 5:30-6:30 p.m., and June 21, 2-3 p.m.) and email basics (June 26, 5:30-6:30 p.m., and June 28, 2-3 p.m.) July classes will focus on Microsoft Excel and Word skills as well as an open computer lab. The library is located at 328 E. 67th St. For more information, call 212-734-1717.

Clean Heat Seminar
Local residents are invited to attend an informational session on the city’s Clean Heat Program Monday, June 4, 6 p.m. at The Chapin School, 100 East End Ave. Resident managers and managing agents as well as co-op board members are also encouraged to attend. The event, sponsored by local civic group CIVITAS, will give residents information about converting heating systems from dirty oil fuel to cleaner alternatives. The Clean Heat program offers help and incentives for switching to cleaner fuels ahead of the city’s mandatory schedule.
Representatives from engineering and energy supply companies will be on hand to answer questions and explain how buildings can convert to receive natural gas from Con Edison. RSVP to the event by calling 212-996-0745 or emailing info@civitasnyc.org.

Marymount Manhattan Class of 2012
On Friday, May 18, the Upper East Side liberal arts school Marymount Manhattan College bid farewell to its class of 2012. Senior class speaker Robbie Torrest, a theater arts major, extolled the individuality of his classmates and spoke of how their experiences at the college and in the city have shaped and sometimes changed the paths of the students. The college awarded an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters to Dr. Ruth Gruber, a journalist and author who has covered Jewish refugees and Holocaust survivors during her long career.
When she received her Ph.D. in Germany at the age of 20 in 1931, Gruber was the youngest person in the world with that title. She served as a special assistant the secretary of the interior during and immediately after World War II, and was selected for a special secret mission in 1944 to escort 1,000 Jewish refugees from Italy to Oswego, N.Y. Gruber has written several books and published photography about her experiences and has been a fierce advocate for refugees.
Faculty and staff member Peter H. Baker and human rights advocate Sheila Barry Tacon also received honorary degrees, and Rocco Landesman, Ph.D., the chair of the National Endowment for the Arts, was the commencement speaker. A total of 431 students were eligible for graduation this year.

New Cardiac Treatment at Local Hospitals
Two Manhattan hospitals—St. Luke’s and Roosevelt—are getting ahead in the treatment of slow heartbeats. The two hospitals will be among the first in the nation to treat patients with INGENIO pacemakers, which help people who suffer from bradycardia, a heart rate of usually less than 60 beats per minute.
“The INGENIO device enables physicians to treat pacemaker patients with an advanced and comprehensive set of therapies,” said Emad Aziz, a doctor in the Department of Medicine and Cardiology at the hospitals. “The INGENIO pacemaker’s MV sensor is easy to optimize and will provide needed therapy for patients to help them feel less fatigued during physical activity.”
With this new device, doctors can keep tabs on their cardiac patients’ health from a distance; the device’s wireless technology can transmit patients’ data to doctors in several locations in North America.

Parking Regulation Map Goes Online
The Department of Transportation announced the launch of an online map that will show parking regulations for every block in New York City. The new tool came about as a result of legislation authored by East Side Council Member Dan Garodnick designed to increase transparency of street and transit data. The map shows parking signs, indicates when roads were last resurfaced and gives a street evaluation for roads in good, fair or poor condition. The DOT hopes that the tool will make resident parking easier, allowing people to check the map for alternate side regulation days before setting off on the daunting task of finding a spot in whatever neighborhood they’re in. This could cut down on the time that drivers are wandering the streets if they know which streets to avoid before they set out.
“New Yorkers shouldn’t be flying blind when they are looking for parking,” said Garodnick, who attributes the idea for the map to his mother. “It can be extremely annoying to drive to a new neighborhood and only learn the parking limitations once you have arrived. This map will let drivers know what they are getting themselves into when they plan a trip, and ultimately will save them some unnecessary headaches.”
Council Member James Vacca, chair of the transportation committee, compared deciphering parking regulations to “understanding Morse code” and praised the city for making it easier, and DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan promised to continue using technology to help residents navigate the city’s transportation system.

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