Posts Tagged ‘Film’

THE READER

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Harvey Weinstein and the ghosts of producers Sydney Pollack and Anthony Minghella are hoping everyone this holiday season will want to see The Reader’s love story about former S.S. guard Hannah Shmitz (Kate Winslet) and the teenage boy she sexually initiates in the late 1950s and the cloud of remorse it casts over his adult [&hellip
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DOUBT

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Religion has taken a beating in the current political climate, so John Patrick Shanley puts his Broadway play Doubt on screen pragmatically—as a showcase for our most revered, grandstanding actors. Meryl Streep and Philip Seymour Hoffman play Sister Aloysius Beauvier and Father Brendan Flynn who, in the early 1960s, butt heads at The Bronx’s St. [&hellip
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IF YOU LIKED IT, THEN YOU SHOULDA PUT A WIG ON IT

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It’s Obama time and black artists still suffer segregation. How else to explain the Gotham Independent Film Awards ignoring Cadillac Records, the most excitingly performed American movie this year? Cadillac Records tells a story of black popular music—its rapidly changing phases during the 1950s from the blues to race records, from rock ’n’ roll to [&hellip
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FROSTY RECEPTION

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Ron Howard shows his stupidity by adapting Peter Morgan’s stage play Frost/Nixon into a pseudo-TV documentary. Another of the year’s endless liberal propaganda strategies, it unsubtly displays the sanctimony that has accrued to TV journalism—in fact, Howard enshrines it. Frost/Nixon dramatizes the series of 1977 TV interviews that British chat host David Frost did with [&hellip
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JAILBAIT

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Baz Luhrmann’s Australia isn’t a history of the penal colony turned commonwealth, but Luhrmann’s absurd, cliché-ridden filmmaking ought to be a jailable offense. In this three-hour chick-flick melodrama, Nicole Kidman (as Lady Sarah Ashley) goes down under where her philandering landowner husband was killed; she takes over the Faraway Downs ranch and hires the Drover [&hellip
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TRANSCENDENT THRILL DRIVE

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Nothing in cinema this week is more important than Transporter 3. It’s been a long time since a new movie has been so spiritually and aesthetically exhilarating. Producer Luc Besson, director Olivier Megaton and star Jason Statham work at the top of their imagination and abilities—not like they’re completing a formulaic sequel but reinventing the [&hellip
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I AM; I AM SUPERMAN

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America’s chief pop cultural obsession of the past 80 odd years contains a rarely discussed dark side. Call it Superhero Derangement Syndrome: the relentless fixation on an unattainable fantasy of crime fighting with otherworldly powers. While such dreamy identification first gained traction as catharsis—perhaps when Superman battled Adolf Hitler, courtesy of DC Comics—it has since [&hellip
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GO BULLDOGS!

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

We like to pretend that no such thing as a ruling class has ever darkened an American shore or danced by the light of an American moon,” writer Lewis Lapham says in his on-screen introduction to John Kirby’s 2005 The American Ruling Class, a cleverly contrived non-fiction film that premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival [&hellip
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THIS LAKE IS ANYTHING BUT PLACID

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Lake City is reminiscent of a lot of great, rarely seen films—from Come Early Morning to Raggedy Man—but the possibility that a movie will ever remind you of Lake City is slim to none. Filmmakers Hunter Hill and Perry Moore can’t seem to agree on a tone for the film, which eventually results in a [&hellip
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DREAMING OF A FRENCH CHRISTMAS

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“Don’t drown,” says Faunia (Emmanuelle Devos) to Henri (Mathieu Almaric), who is drowning in misery over his unsatisfying relationship with his haughty sister. Faunia assures him: “You have no family.” That’s because girlfriend Faunia is a specter from the haute-soap opera world of Arnaud Desplechin where the usual love sentiments are replaced by distrust, suspicion, [&hellip
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