Posts Tagged ‘Film’

The Way of Pixarism

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Pixar rules pop media like nothing since mid-20th century General Motors held sway as the preeminent American corporation (and the bane of grassroots individualism). Every Pixar film—including the new Up, gushed over by Cannes Film Festival shills—is greeted with nearly patriotic fervor. This absurdity clarifies contemporary news media’s unprincipled collusion with Hollywood capitalism
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Terminator Salvation

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

All Terminator movies are the same: junk. But McG’s Terminator Salvation has an important new element: humanity. In the opening scene, terminally ill scientist Dr. Serena Kogan (Helena Bonham Carter) poignantly addresses Marcus Wright (Sam Worthington), a convicted murderer on Death Row. Her odd request that he donate his organs to science could be sinister, [&hellip
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The Beautiful and the Damned

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The System rewards Steven Soderbergh and he pays his Faustian debt with haughty judgments. Soderbergh’s new film The Girlfriend Experience is the most unironic celebration of materialist privilege since Woody Allen’s Reagan-era heralds Manhattan and Hannah and Her Sisters. Already proclaimed, even in the alternative media, The Girlfriend Experience paints a gaudy face on the [&hellip
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A NY State of Cannes

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Martin Scorsese looked a little out of place against the lavish backdrop of the French Riviera, but the crowd was still happy to have him there. Presenting a special restoration of The Red Shoes to an appreciative audience at the 62nd Cannes Film Festival, Scorsese absorbed the spotlight. “We love you, Marty!” someone with a [&hellip
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CORALINE

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“Find our eyes, and our souls will be free.” That should be the credo of every film animator who pretends to make innocuous commercial entertainment. But it comes from Henry Selik’s deeply amusing Coraline—an animated film that might be too good for children. It arrives in time to expose the atrocious Wall-E. Coraline’s story of [&hellip
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FANBOYS

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Set in 1998, the decade that began pop culture’s fragmentation, Fanboys finds comedy in movie fanaticism. Four Ohio-bred, post-high school Star Wars geeks—Eric (Sam Huntington), Linus (Chris Marquette), Hutch (Dan Fogler), Windows (Jay Baruchel) and a smart tag-along female—make a pilgrimage to Skywalker Ranch, the new Mecca. That may sound trivial, but something’s genuine in [&hellip
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RENEE ZELLWEGER ONLY INDUCES YAWNS IN TRANSPARENTLY POPULIST NEW IN TOWN

Written by admin on . Posted in Film

The funniest thing about New in Town is the title. Its fish-out-of-water story of Miami-based corporate executive Lucy Hill (Renée Zellweger) sent to small town Ulm, Minnesota, to downsize a snack-food plant is old as Zellweger’s clumsy female Bridget Jones formula—and old as Hollywood’s hills. Yawn-inducing déjà vu descends upon scenes of
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OF TIME AND THE CITY

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Movies, at their greatest, are personal endeavors. That’s true for audiences as well as filmmakers—especially Terence Davies, whose newest film Of Time and The City continues his individual exploration of the medium. Once again, Davies revisits his youth growing up in post-WWII Liverpool, England—as in the masterly features Distant Voices, Still Lives and The Long [&hellip
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THE LODGER

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Unlike Terence Davies, whose use of the cinematic past becomes a felt element in his storytelling, writer-director David Ondaatje repeats the past so inexpertly that The Lodger (an update of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1926 film) is almost comically schlocky. Ondaatje’s poor technique lowers the basic material—the Jack the Ripper legend, which has already been remade three [&hellip
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