Posts Tagged ‘Film’

Paris

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It would easy—and wrong—to dismiss Cédric Klapisch’s Paris over Claire Denis’ 35 Shots of Rum. Although they’re opposite visions of contemporary Parisian life—Klapisch’s mostly white middle class juxtaposes Denis’ black working class—both are rather wonderful. They complement each other. Klapisch, like Denis, has also reached his filmmaking peak. This multi-character film contrasts life and death, [&hellip
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The Other Man

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No longer exploiting the Jewish Holocaust as in last year’s The Reader, author Bernard Schlink reveals the essence of his trite, lurid imagination in The Other Man. This adultery melodrama—starring Liam Neeson, Laura Linney and Antonio Banderas—uses a Schlinkian time-shifting narrative to detail the lustful secrets and deceits in a longtime British marriage
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Crude

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At several points during Crude, the zealous new documentary about the 14 years of litigation that brought Chevron oil company to trial for environmental destruction it wreaked upon the Ecuadorean Amazon, director Joe Berlinger almost goes into detours that detail the complicated phenomena behind the human rights industry: 1) activist and Riverside Drive resident Steven [&hellip
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Amreeka

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Fashionable political-correctness is so rampant in recent films like Wayne Kramer’s self-righteous immigrant saga Crossing Over, Tom McCarthy’s saccharine immigrant saga The Visitor and Julia Loktev’s suicide-bomber saga Day Night Day Night, that I kept expecting Amreeka’s immigrant drama—a debut feature by writer-director Cherien Dabis—to be similarly preachy, doomy and obnoxious. (Even its title, an [&hellip
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Odd Man Out & Confessions of a Ex-Doofus-Itchyfooted Mutha

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Odd Man Out’s re-issue this week at Film Forum coincides with the new DVD release of John Boorman’s latest The Tiger’s Tail and the recent, brief run of Melvin Van Peebles’ Confessions of an Ex-Doofus-Itchyfooted Mutha. All three are Old Masters’ movies—the 1947 Odd Man Out representing classical period director Carol Reed, Boorman sustaining British [&hellip
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Taking Woodstock

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Taking Woodstock’s cinematic problems start with wobbly psychedelic graphics that divide the title into three words: Taking/Wood/Stock. Is that title a naughty pun or a banal pun? Director Ang Lee and his writer-producer James Schamus try having it both ways. That’s regrettably typical of this middlebrow team whose high-minded concepts always try for controversy (Brokeback [&hellip
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St Trinian’s

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Said to be the third highest-grossing U.K independent film of all time, St. Trinian’s represents a travesty of the British comic tradition. Although it was produced under the banner of the legendary Ealing Studios, whose theatrical flair created a beloved standard for the subtle and familiar depiction of English eccentricity in the 1940s and ’50s, [&hellip
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Inglorious Basterds

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“Back to barbarism” is the theme of Quentin Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds. Its misspelled title and cheesy homage to a 1970s grindhouse flick (by Enzo Castellari) all mock the notion of sophistication. Yet, it is truly unsophisticated. A barbaric jamboree, it uses the Jewish Holocaust as a pretext for gore, sadism and fanboy lore. This hipster [&hellip
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Bandslam

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If the late John Hughes had taught the generation who grew up on Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off and Home Alone anything beyond narcissism, then Todd Graff’s new film, Bandslam, would be getting sky-high praise. Instead, the barely hyped Bandslam must settle for simply being the best American movie this summer. [&hellip
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