Posts Tagged ‘Film Reviews’

Hideaway (Le Refuge)

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By Armond White At the heart of François Ozon’s Hideaway (Le Refuge)—the story of Mousse (Isabelle Carré), who goes to the country in the final months of expecting a child and takes in the late-father’s brother Paul (Louis-Ronan Choisy)—director Ozon asks an excellent question: What do a pregnant woman and a gay man have in [&hellip
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A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop

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By Armond White The Hollywood precedent for one great director remaking another’s work starts with Fritz Lang refashioning both Jean Renoir’s La Chienne and La Bête Humaine into, respectively, Scarlet Street and Human Desire—turning art into entertainment. Now Zhang Yimou remakes the Coen Brothers’ debut film Blood Simple into A Woman, a Gun and a [&hellip
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Takers

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By Armond White Takers has a Brother vibe that only partly has to do with most of its dapper bank robber cast being African American. Co-producing rap artists and stars, Tip “T.I.” Harris and Chris Brown, make vivid use of the crime movie genre’s social significance, which lackadaisical film commentators have mostly ignored. Takers accents [&hellip
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Centurion

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By Armond White Why make a genre movie—any movie, really—without inspiration? Neil Marshall, the director of the horror film The Descent, now comes up with another late genre entry: his imagination evident in the redundant antiquity battle tale’s title, Centurion. Shadowed by Zack Snyder’s fascinating 300, Marshall adds nothing new to the basic plot, least [&hellip
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Mesrine: Killer Instinct & Public Enemy No. 1

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By Armond White Killer Instinct, the first of the two-part French gangster film Mesrine, finally opens in the U.S. following a highly praised home turf reception. But it also has the misfortune of coming right after the Anthology Film Archives’ compelling William Lustig program of crime movies and what Variety calls “actioners,” where zero-prestige works [&hellip
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The Tillman Story

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By Armond White “Fratricide” is the word used in Amir Bar-Lev’s doc The Tillman Story to describe the 4/22/04 incident in which Pvt. George Tillman was killed while on duty in Afghanistan. It is a sign of Bar-Lev’s political bias that his film favors that moralizing term over the military designation “friendly fire” to describe [&hellip
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The Sign of Rohmer

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By Armond White The late Eric Rohmer is not known for his audacity—but he should be. The Film Society of Lincoln Center’s complete retrospective of the director’s quietly masterful career, “The Sign of Rohmer” (Aug. 18-Sept. 3), confirms his daring. This is an irresistible opportunity to see his experimental musical The Tree, The Mayor and [&hellip
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The Expendables

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By Armond White Past meets present in The Expendables, Sylvester Stallone’s not-so-sly exploitation of action-movie aficionados that unites 1980s action heroes—the incongruously named Sly (himself), Bruce (Willis) and Arnold (Schwarzenegger)—with a few contemporary action-figure he-men: Jason Statham, Jet Li and the wrestling world’s Steve Austin and Randy Couture. But proof that Stallone is living in [&hellip
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Sarli and Hawks

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Remembering a time when actresses still had curves and eroticism could work both ways By Armond White I first saw Carne, a showcase for Argentinian sex symbol Isabel Sarli, at a San Sebastian Film Festival revival of that 1968 film while in the company of John Waters and his assistant Pat Moran. The duo provided [&hellip
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Despicable Me

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By Armond White Despicable Me poses a crucial summer question: Is it possible to enjoy a movie simply for what it is or does hype determine audience response? This 3-D animated comedy, developed by technicians from France’s Mac Guff Ligne graphic arts company, makes genuinely witty use of 3-D trompe l’oeil: The ladders that stretch [&hellip
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