Posts Tagged ‘City Arts’

City Arts: Doing the Right Thing

Written by Armond White on . Posted in Arts & Film, Theater

DoingtheRightThing600 Mamet’s ‘The Anarchist’ explores our social divide Debra Winger in The Anarchist. Broadway’s newest drama, The Anarchist, proves that David Mamet has not just become a conservative; he’s become a poet. Taking as his inspiration the 1981 Brinks incident where subversives from the Weatherman Underground were convicted for killing a Nyack, N.J., policeman, Mamet examines the motives [&hellip
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City Arts: Pitt Beats Clooney

Written by Armond White on . Posted in Arts & Film, Arts Our Town, Arts Our Town Downtown, Arts West Side Spirit, Film

KillingThemSoftly600 Armond White on how ‘Killing Them Softly’ amps political movie war Brad Pitt in ‘Killing Them Softly’ Killing Them Softly earns a footnote in cultural history for being the first dramatic film to question the Obama cult. It happens in a thrilling climactic moment that is part of director Andrew Dominik’s scheme examining America’s current financial [&hellip
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City Arts: ‘Hitchcock’ is Myopic Bio-Pic

Written by Armond White on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

MyopicBioPic600 ‘Hitchcock’ shows the maestro without humor Sacha Gervasi’s Anvil: The Story of Anvil, the 2010 chronicle of the little-known rock band, was a rare excellent documentary; a film distinguished by its good-hearted recognition of what lies beneath artistic motive. Only a little of that beneficence is apparent in Gervasi’s dramatic debut Hitchcock, which takes a fanciful approach [&hellip
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Armond White: Come Back, Little Buddha

Written by NYPress on . Posted in Arts & Film, Arts Our Town, Arts Our Town Downtown, Arts West Side Spirit, Film, Our Town, Our Town Downtown, West Side Spirit

Buddha600 PIETY WRECKS ANG LEE’S ‘LIFE OF PI’ By Armond White No one can make a dull film like Ang Lee can. His new Life of Pi doesn’t settle for being a 3D extravaganza. At a reported cost of $70 million and three years in production, it is intended to combine philosophical rumination with a tent-pole thrill ride. [&hellip
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City Arts: The Pageantry of Rhetoric

Written by Armond White on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film, Our Town Downtown

PageantryRhetoric600 How Spielberg’s ‘Lincoln’ parlays the ‘great man’ notions of history “You begin your second term with semi-divine status,” the 16th president of the United States is told in Steven Spielberg’s film Lincoln. The evidence of that status is in the film’s mythifying visual style that presents Abraham Lincoln as an icon—silhouetted, spectral, sculptural. The people around [&hellip
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On His Majesty’s Secret Service: 007′s “Skyfall” Goes Sky-High

Written by Armond White on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Naomie Harris and Daniel Craig in 007's Skyfall. Agent 007 James Bond (Daniel Craig) returns to his roots in Skyfall, defending the MI6 agency to which he’s always had steadfast dedication, even while gallantly enjoying its bachelor benefits. On home turf, Bond restores all of us to our pop culture roots; Skyfall’s national security plot, combining an arch villain’s (Javier Bardem) threats to [&hellip
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For Your Ears Only: The Best James Bond Themes Remembered

Written by Armond White on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

goldfinger Shirley Eaton Movie theme songs work as souvenirs; they bring the movie back to your heart—through your ears. No movie series has given the world more aural mementos than the James Bond films. Like the lusted-over, fantasized Bond girls, the Bond themes are not just love objects; the songs are timeless, idealized encapsulations of the excitements of [&hellip
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Storm Warnings: Notes on Ades’ Opera and Alisa Weilerstein

Written by Jay Nordlinger on . Posted in Arts & Film, Music

alisa weilerstein By Jay Nordlinger Philip Glass and John Adams are the most famous living classical composers (if you don’t count John Williams). Who would be next? Possibly Thomas Adès, the Brit. His opera The Tempest is maybe the most acclaimed opera of recent years. And it has been playing at the Metropolitan Opera. The composer himself [&hellip
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Wagging the dog

Written by Melissa Stern on . Posted in Arts & Film, Arts Our Town, Arts Our Town Downtown, Arts West Side Spirit, Museums, Our Town, Our Town Downtown, West Side Spirit

Wagging600 Wegman Throws Sincerity A Bone Irony is one the most overused conceits in contemporary art. So much so that the term “ironic hipster” has become part of our current lexicon. I’m tired of ironic hipster art, minimal drawings coupled with what are meant to be pearls of wisdom encapsulated in a tagline.  The current show [&hellip
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‘Frankenweenie’ vs. ‘ParaNorman’

Written by Armond White on . Posted in Arts & Film, Arts Our Town, Arts West Side Spirit, Film, Our Town, West Side Spirit

Frankenweenie600 THE TRICK AND TREAT OF HOLLYWOOD HALLOWEEN Tim Burton reaches the outer limits of creepy in Frankenweenie, the 3D remake of his 1984 animated short about a boy who plays Frankenstein and brings his dead dog Sparky back to life. That’s why it was a relief to step from that gothic cliché to the more [&hellip
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