Posts Tagged ‘Books’

Book Review: The Postmortal

Written by Mark Peikert on . Posted in Arts & Film, Books

Our obsession with youth reaches its ultimate climax in Drew Magary’s new novel, The Postmortal. An accidental scientific discovery reveals a way to render people ageless: Once injected with a serum, patients cease to grow older than their age at that moment. Suddenly, people worldwide remain in their twenties and thirties forever, rendering death from old [&hellip
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Book Review: Blueprints for Building Better Girls

Written by Mark Peikert on . Posted in Arts & Film, Books

Imagine, if you will, a Mary Gaitskill story collection in which the author casts a fond eye on the foibles and bad behavior of her characters. That book is Elissa Schappell’s Blueprints for Building Better Girls, a collection of eight sharp, meticulously etched and tenuously linked tales of female archetypes. Whatever stereotypes still cling to those [&hellip
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Book Review: City of Promise

Written by Mark Peikert on . Posted in Arts & Film, Books

When was the last time your heart started pounding while you read a novel? Or learned something you didn’t know about Manhattan’s history? If you can’t remember, then run, do not walk, to purchase a copy of Beverly Swerling’s compulsively readable City of Promise. Set in the Manhattan of the 1870s and ’80s, when elevated subways [&hellip
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Book Review: Incognito

Written by Mark Peikert on . Posted in Arts & Film, Books

The milieu of early-20th-century New York City is the purview of Edith Wharton, and any author who dares to set their novels in the same time period will suffer in the comparison. To his credit, Gregory Murphy isn’t as interested in the manners and moirés of the time as Wharton was. By necessity, he isn’t [&hellip
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Book Review: Incognito

Written by Mark Peikert on . Posted in Arts & Film, Books, NY Press Exclusive

incogni The milieu of early-20th-century New York City remains almost exclusively the purview of Edith Wharton, and any author who dares to set their novels in the same time period will suffer in the comparison. To his credit, Gregory Murphy isn’t as interested in the manners and moirés of the time as Wharton was. By necessity, [&hellip
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Book Review: Stories I Only Tell My Friends

Written by Mark Peikert on . Posted in Arts & Film, Books

Like his character on The West Wing, White House speechwriter Sam Seaborn, Rob Lowe stays admirably on message in his new memoir, Stories I Only Tell My Friends. He’s at pains to paint himself as a grounded, levelheaded man who has (mostly) successfully navigated the rapids of early fame and success, debilitating personal crises and then a [&hellip
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Book Review: Sisters of Fortune

Written by Mark Peikert on . Posted in Arts & Film, Books

Imagine if, instead of finding defeat at the hands of those crafty, debauched Europeans, Henry James’ heroines triumphed, and found love, money and social position across the Atlantic? The result would be something like the real lives of Maryland’s Caton sisters—Marianne, Louisa, Bess and Emily, vividly recreated by biographer Jehanne Wake in Sisters of Fortune. Beautiful, [&hellip
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Book Review: American Rose

Written by Mark Peikert on . Posted in Arts & Film, Books

American-Rose-The-Life-and-Times-of-Gypsy-Rose-Lee Considering how obsessed biographer Karen Abbott (Sin in the Second City) is with Gypsy Rose Lee’s flair of emphasizing the tease in striptease, it should be no surprise that Gypsy’s secrets remain at least half-buried, despite the 300-plus pages of Abbott’s strenuously titled American Rose: A Nation Laid Bare: The Life and Times of Gypsy Rose [&hellip
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