Letters

Written by on . Posted in News West Side Spirit, Opinion and Column, Opinion Our Town, Our Town, West Side Spirit.


Republican Kool-Aid
Clyde Williams must be hanging out with a lot of Republicans (“How Romney-Ryan Plans Would Hurt NY Seniors,” Oct. 18) if he believes that entitlements need to be reformed.
Both Medicare and Social Security are solvent and need only minor tweaking. Social Security has $2.7 trillion in its trust fund and is solvent until 2033. Removing the wage cap on the payroll tax is the only change that is acceptable. Medicare is solvent until 2024 and only needs minor tweaking such as Obama’s proposed Independent Payment Advisory Board.

The only way for entitlements to be there for future generations is to maintain their current form and do nothing to alter and weaken them.
—Reba Shimansky

Zest for Life
I really enjoyed reading this (“Ed Asner Off the Cuff,” Oct. 11). Ed Asner is an inspiration to all of us approaching the later decades of our lives. Glad the interviewer fielded such broad-based questions—Ed’s zest for life is so apparent in his answers.
—Lilian B.

The Real Issue
MTA’s plans to remove trash cans at additional Manhattan subway stations missed that besides litter left on platforms, subway cars and buses, riders have to deal with those who hog two seats or who yawn, cough or sneeze without covering up.

There are other ways to fight the growth of rats, mice and litter. The MTA should consider installing separate cans for recycling newspapers, plastic and glass along with regular garbage. Selling advertising on the side of cans could generate revenue to help cover the costs of more frequent off-peak and late-night collection and disposal. If asked, the NYC Department of Sanitation could do the same on the street adjacent to subway station entrances.

Many have forgotten that up until the late 1960s, it was common to find penny gum and 10-cent soda machines dispensing products at subway stations. That generation of riders did not litter subway stations and buses leaving behind gum, candy wrappers, paper cups, bottles and newspapers.

Police have more important tasks to perform by preventing fare evasion, pickpockets, mugging, sexual harassment and other real crimes against victims rather than give out $250 fines to those caught snacking on the subways.
—Larry Penner

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