City Week: June 18-24


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A Selective Listing of Recommended Cultural & Community Events Compiled by [Alexandra Waldhorn]


Friday, June 18?
Motion Art?Susan Mastrangelo's show, Slice of Life, presented by the Midtown Arts Common, captures the figural gestures of humans experiencing both the banality and the excitement of daily life. Exhibitors call it a "proscenium of the street, arrested in motion." Narthex Gallery at Saint Peter's Church, 619 Lexington Ave., 212-935-2200; 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Free. Jazz Festival?George Wein's CareFusion Jazz Festival kicks off with an all-star lineup from the Jazz Gallery, including Roy Hargove, Claudia Acuna, Ambrose Akinmusire, Lage Lund, Gerald Clayton, Kendrick Scott, Ben Williams, Pedro Martinez and Miguel Zenon. Through June 25. Symphony Space, Peter Jay Sharp Theatre, 2537 Broadway, 212-864-5400; 8 p.m., $15. Ukrainian Icons?The Museum of Biblical Art examines the culture and history of Ukraine with 70 icons, crosses, textiles, chalices and other rare liturgical objects from Kyiv's famed Monastery of the Caves, many never shown before in the U.S. This historic Orthodox Christian monastery was founded in 1051 and is the oldest Orthodox monastery in Eastern Europe. Museum of Biblical Art, 1865 Broadway, 212-408-1500; noon to 6 p.m., $7.
Saturday, June 19?
Ships Ahoy?Take a trip on a retired fireboat and 103-year-old tug on the Hudson River, and a dockside tour of a former Coast Guard steamship. Noted maritime historian Norman Brouwer talks about historic ships throughout the afternoon on the former U.S. Coast Guard Lighthouse Tender, Lilac. North side of Pier 40 at Houston Street and the Hudson River, reservations recommended, www.nrhss.org; 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Free. Swing Time?Hone your Charleston skills for the season finale of the New York Swing Dance Society, which starts again this fall. The Solomon Douglas Swingtet provides the music. St. Jean the Baptiste Church Hall, 184 E. 76th St., 212-NY-NYSDS; 7 p.m. to midnight, $11 to $15. Upscale Flea?Visit The MARTE, the weekly Manhattan Artisan Retail and Trade Emporium. The upscale market is a collaboration between the host school's Parents Association and this paper's publisher, Manhattan Media. Proceeds go to P.S. 63. Kids receive free Hawaiian shaved ice all day and lucky shoppers receive free Broadway tickets throughout the day. P.S. 63, Fourth Street between First Avenue and Avenue A, 212-268-0501; noon to 6 p.m., Free. Good Cause?Support the Youth Empowerment Scholarship, which helps teenagers and foster kids enrolled in college, by taking in a performance of Dream Babies, a musical about youth living in foster care, presented by the Riant Theater. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis High School, 120 W. 46th St., 646-623-3488; 8 p.m., $25 to $250. ?
Sunday, June 20
Opera Benefit?The mid-19th-century melodrama, Linda di Chamounix, by Gaetano Donizetti, plays tonight. All proceeds benefit the Trinity Place Shelter for homeless LGBT youth. Trinity Lutheran Church of Manhattan, 164 W. 100th St., 212-877-0509; 7 p.m., $10 suggested donation.
Monday, June 21
Optical Illusion?A reception celebrates Diane Englander's Paintings and Drawings, which goes on view today. A former consultant to non-profits before she began to paint full-time in late 2007, Englander is known for making her canvases appear larger than they are with minimal use of lines and rich, often glowing surfaces. Saint Peter's Church, downstairs Living Room Gallery, 619 Lexington Ave., 917-922-0666; 6 p.m., Free. Celebrate Pride?The annual LGBT celebration, Spirit of Pride, focuses on a number of plays and musicals that examine global issues in the LGBT community, such as family and adoption, religion and relationships, and the military. Among the performers are Bobby Steggert, Brian Childers, Jeremy Lawrence, Mildred Dred Gerestant and Donnetta Lavinia Grays. Cathedral of St. John the Divine, 1047 Amsterdam Avenue, 212-316-7337; 7:30 p.m., Free. Greek Visionary?Described as one of the largest musical events in the city's history, the fourth "Make Music New York" celebrates the music of visionary Greek composer Iannis Xenakis, with performances throughout Central Park. Events include Persephassa in rowboats, an Oresteia puppet show and the Yale Percussion Group. Follow interactive electronic performances in the Meatpacking district, more than 100 punk bands on Governors Island and hundreds of homegrown ensembles playing all over town. Throughout the city, www.makemusicny.org; 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Free. Street Sounds?Give your musical talent a test and sit down at one of 60 pianos installed on the city's streets, part of Sing For Hope, a public service organization for artists. The project is part of "Play Me, I'm Yours," a worldwide public art project by British artist Luke Jerram. An opening festival offers free concerts in public spaces throughout the city. Find a piano at Lincoln Center, Central Park (Merchants' Gate, Bandshell, Dana Discovery Center) and Riverside Park, among 30 other Manhattan locations. www.nycstreetpianos.com; through July 5, Free.
Tuesday, June 22
Frick History?See how the former home of Adelaide and Henry Clay Frick was transformed into a museum. A collection of architectural drawings, photographs and other materials are gathered in the educational display, "From Mansion to Museum: The Frick Collection Celebrates Seventy-Five Years." The Frick Collection, 1 E. 70th St., 212-628-4417; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., $5 to $18. Climate Talk?A discussion focuses on how climate change, energy and national security are connected, and why their effects threaten the stability of different world regions. John Mroz, president and CEO of the Eastwest Institute, moderates the panel, featuring leading experts like rear admiral Neil Morisetti, climate and energy security envoy of the U.K. Ministry of Defense and Foreign Commonwealth office. The American Museum of Natural History, Kaufmann Theater, first floor, West 79th Street and Central Park West, 212-769-5200; 5:30 p.m. for wine, coffee and snacks for purchase, with the discussion starting at 6:30 p.m., Free. ? Artists' Health?Oil painter and illustrator Roberto Parada shares his insight on how he made his studio a safer place after being diagnosed with bone marrow failure. He discusses what art supplies to get rid of and why, and how to keep oil painting in his life safe. Society of Illustrators, 128 E. 63rd St., 212-838-2560; 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., $7 to $15. Summer Series?The Naumburg concert series kicks off in Central Park tonight with The Knights. The ensemble, led by conductor Eric Jacobsen, performs works by Mendelssohn, Schubert and Dvorak, featuring cellist Jan Vogler, and a rarely performed work by Morton Feldman. The first 100 attendees receive DVDs. Concert ground in Central Park, south of the 72nd Street cross-drive, 212-501-7809; 7:30 p.m., Free.
Wednesday, June 23
Wilcock on Warhol?Join Village Voice founder John Wilcock in a discussion of the new edition of his book, The Autobiography and Sex Life of Andy Warhol. First published in 1971, the book was the first oral biography of the artist during the early years of his fame. The New York Public Library, south court auditorium, 476 Fifth Ave., 917-275-6975; 6 p.m. (doors open at 5:30 p.m.), Free. Colson Conversation?Join New York-based novelist Colson Whitehead, author of Sag Harbor, in conversation with Samantha Hunt, author of The Invention of Everything Else, at the Bryant Park Reading Room in a shady corner of the park. Bryant Park Reading Room, 42nd Street side of the park between the back of the Public Library and Sixth Avenue, 212-768-4242; 12:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m., Free. Food on Film?The New York City Food Film Festival, hosted by and benefiting the Food Bank for New York City, kicks off with "The Great New York City Shuck 'N' Suck," an all-you-can-eat oyster feast, four short oyster films and a shucking contest. Films continue across the city until June 27. Water Taxi Beach, South Street Seaport, 89 South St., www.nycfoodfilmfestival.com; 7 p.m., $95. MGM Classics?Join the popular Upper West Side institution Sing! Sing! Sing! and belt out some of the best tunes from MGM's famed musicals. Anne Phillips and Michael Shepley play piano and the audience takes over with songs, including "The Trolley Song," "Singin' in the Rain" and "Taking a Chance on Love." The Triad, 158 W. 72nd St., 212-786-9064; 7 p.m., $10 plus two-drink minimum.
Thursday, June 24
Cotton and Friends?The James Cotton Blues Band and an all-star line-up of contemporary blues giants, including Taj Mahal, Hubert Sumlin, Pinetop Perkins, Willie "Big Eyes" Smith, Shemekia Copeland, Darrell Nulisch and David Maxwell, play for a special one-night show. Cotton, the greatest living blues harmonica master, shows what the blues are really about. Rose Theater, Broadway at West 60th Street, 212-721-6500; 8 p.m., $35 to $85.

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