Friday, April 9
All of Eder?Vocalist Linda Eder returns to Feinstein's at Loews Regency as the star of her new show, All of Me. The award-winning Broadway star sings music from her latest CD of classic Hollywood songs, Soundtrack, as well as original compositions, standards and fan favorites. Through April 17. Performance schedule varies. Feinstein's at Loews Regency, 540 Park Ave., 212-339-4095; 8 p.m., $75 to $95, plus cover charge and food/drink minimum. Through Artists' Eyes?David Dearinger, former chief curator of the National Academy, lectures about the history and importance of the academy's annual exhibition, currently on display. The 185th Annual Exhibition features work by 65 artists, working in a variety of styles and media, providing a glimpse of contemporary American art as seen through the eyes of artists. National Academy Museum and School of Fine Arts, 1083 Fifth Ave., 212-369-4880; 6:45 p.m., Free with $8 admission. Book Lover's Delight?The Park Avenue Armory hosts the 50th annual New York Antiquarian Book Fair. Two hundred of the world's finest dealers offer rare books, manuscripts, autographs, maps, finely bound volumes and ephemera for sale. Visitors can peruse categories like history, law, music, dance, fashion, gastronomy, children's books, art and philosophy. Through April 11. Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Ave., 212-777-5218; noon to 8 p.m., $20. Music and Meal?April is jazz appreciation month, and Jazz at Lincoln Center combines food and music to mark the occasion. The inaugural "Jazz Day" celebration features special dishes from America's greatest jazz cities, including New York strip steak and cheesecake and New Orleans shrimp gumbo. Chicago, Kansas City, Austin, Los Angeles and San Francisco are also represented. Saxophonist Walter Blanding of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra performs, and discusses jazz's influence on life and music in America and around the world. Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Circle, second floor, 212-258-9800; 6:30 p.m., $85. Melody Meets Poetry?The second season of "Music/Words," the interdisciplinary series begun by pianist Inna Falks, continues with a performance at Bechstein Pianos. The program features Leon Livshin performing piano music by Scriabin, Chopin and Ravel, while contemporary poet and playwright Teddy Jefferson reads from his new works. Bechstein Pianos, 207 W. 58th St., 212-581-5550; 7:30 p.m., $15. Inspired by Ansel?The Temple University Symphony Orchestra performs two new works for the first time at Alice Tully Hall. The most notable work, "Ansel Adams: America," is written by jazz legend Dave Brubeck and his son, Chris, and features 100 projected images by the famous photographer. Works by Leonard Bernstein and Samuel Barber, as well as the New York premiere of a work by Bill Cunliffe, are also on the program. Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center, 1941 Broadway, 212-721-6500; 8 p.m., $20 to $35.
Saturday, April 10
Bringing Bawdy Back?One of New York's most well-known burlesque shows, Bawdy, returns. "Grace Gotham," "Mistress B" and "Laura the Kazoo Girl" entertain, along with special guest star Dorothy Bishop from America's Got Talent. Proceeds go to Marriage Equality NY. The Triad Theatre, 158 W. 72nd St., 212-362-2590; 9:30 p.m., $25 plus two-drink minimum.
Sunday, April 11
Virtuoso Performance?The New York Virtuoso Singers close the 2009-2010 season with a concert featuring the work of composers John Corigliano and his partner, Mark Adamo. Between them, the two have produced hundreds of chamber, vocal, choral and orchestral works. A pre-concert talk with the composers begins one hour before the start of the performance. St. Ignatius of Antioch Episcopal Church, 552 West End Ave., 212-279-4200; 3 p.m., $20. Chopin's Bicentennial?In celebration of the 200th birthday of the brilliant pianist and composer Frederic Chopin, Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church hosts a performance of some of Chopin's best-known works. Vietnamese pianist Quynh Nguyen, called one of the "19 young stars of tomorrow" by the Boston Globe, performs works including "Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor (Funeral March)" and the "Grande Polonaise Brilliante in E-flat major." Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church, 921 Madison Ave., 212-288-8920; 3 p.m., $15.
Monday, April 12
Dorsky at MoMA?As part of the "Modern Mondays" film series, filmmaker Nathaniel Dorsky discusses his methods of creating silent films, and screens all four parts of his recently completed quartet: Sarabande (2008), Winter (2008), Compline (2009) and Aubade (2010). A discussion follows. Titus Theatre 2 at the Museum of Modern Art, 11 W. 53rd St., 212-708-9480; 7 p.m., $10.
Tuesday, April 13
Tomaselli Talks?The American Federation of Arts' lecture series ArtTalks features California-based artist Fred Tomaselli. Known for his paintings?which make use of both natural objects like leaves, and non-natural, printed materials and pharmaceuticals encased in resin?Tomaselli's work has been displayed at the Whitney Biennial and the Museum of Modern Art, among other places. A Q&A session follows, along with a wine reception. Christie's, 20 Rockefeller Plaza, 212-988-7700; 6:30 p.m., $15. Light Fight?The Municipal Art Society presents a panel discussion about lights and lighting technology. The panel covers several issues, including sustainable and sufficient lighting in New York City, as well as the potential role of LED technology in lighting New York. French Institute Alliance Française, 22 E. 60th St. (note: tentative location; visit www.mas.org for updates), 212-935-2075; 6:30 p.m., $10 to $15.
Wednesday, April 14
Cancer Check?Lenox Hill Hospital offers a free screening for oral, head and neck cancer. Each year, 40,000 cases of these cancers are diagnosed, making it the sixth-most common form of cancer in the United States. Tobacco and alcohol use are the most common risk factors. Screenings are quick and painless: doctors check the mouth and nose with a light, then feel salivary and thyroid glands and neck lymph nodes. Walk-ins welcome until 4 p.m. Otolaryngology Unit, Lenox Hill Hospital, second floor, 186 E. 76th St., 212-434-2323; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Free. Sneak Peek?Hunter College hosts a fundraiser that offers attendees the chance to see the refurbished Roosevelt House, former home of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, before it is officially reopened as a public policy center. The evening includes a live performance of Eddie, a one-man show penned by two Hunter alums that tells the story of Eddie Jacobson, a former business partner and friend of President Harry S. Truman, who lobbied Truman to support the newly formed state of Israel. A reception and talkback session follows. Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College, 47-49 E. 65th St., 212-772-4087; 6:30 p.m., $125. Poets Out Loud?Fordham University at Lincoln Center's poetry community, Poets Out Loud, hosts a reading by award-winning poet Edward Hirsch. Hirsch's latest book, The Living Fire, features selected poems from each of his previous collections, published between 1981 and 2008. Fordham graduate student Sarah Schwartz and selected high school students also read their works. A reception and book signing follow. Fordham University at Lincoln Center, 113 W. 60th St., 12th floor lounge, 212-636-6792; 7 p.m., Free. Lady of the Camelias?A cast of francophone actors performs a new adaptation of The Lady of the Camelias. Written by Rene de Ceccatty in 2000 and based on the novel by Alexandre Dumas fils, the show is an intimate and intense exploration of the forbidden love between a Parisian courtesan and a respectable young man. A synopsis in English is available, as well as projected subtitles on certain evenings. Through April 25. Arclight Theater, 152 W. 71st St., 212-868-4444; 8 p.m., $30 to $100.
Thursday, April 15
Across the Pond?The New-York Historical Society presents "London: Template for the Yankee City." Architectural historian and PBS host Barry Lewis discusses the growth of the British capital in the 17th century, and explores the commercial and royal origins of the city and its architectural evolution. Lewis also covers London's affect on American cities and its role in Anglo-American capitalism. New York Society for Ethical Culture, 2 W. 64th St., 212-868-4444; 6:30 p.m., $20. Three Scoops of Schubert?The New York Philomusica Chamber Ensemble presents three works by the composer Franz Schubert. For this show, the last of the 2009-10 season, the ensemble is joined by Metropolitan Opera star soprano Korliss Uecker, who performs Schubert's masterpiece, "The Shepherd on the Rock." Artistic Director A. Robert Johnson hosts a free "Meet the Artists" interview 30 minutes before the program, and a reception for the audience and musicians follows the performance. Broadway Presbyterian Church, 601 W. 114th St., 212-580-9933; 8 p.m., $30.