City Week: April 16–April 22

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Friday, April 16

Waller Tribute—Jazz at Lincoln Center presents “The Music of Fats Waller,” part of the Fats Waller Festival. Under the musical direction of composer, arranger and saxophonist Andy Farber, a cast of musicians performs a retrospective of his short career. Entertainer Ben Vereen serves as host. Waller was known as a gifted stride pianist, composer and entertainer. Ken Druker hosts a pre-concert discussion 7 p.m. Rose Theater, Frederick P. Rose Hall, 33 W. 60th St., 212-721-6500; 8 p.m., $30 to $120.
Momentum—Flamenco artist Maya de Silva’s Flamenco Revolucion presents “Going Forward, Looking Back.” The performance is based in traditional Andalusian dance, but also combines contemporary dance and American ideas with Gypsy and Spanish dance. For an extra $20, patrons can join the artists for a glass of wine after the performance to help the company attend the Jacob’s Pillow’s Inside/Out Dance Festival, where they have been invited to perform this summer. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Theatre, 120 W. 46th St., 212-868-4444; 8 p.m., $12 to $25.

Fab Four—The Calhoun Performing Arts Series presents Jazz at Calhoun with The Jim Seeley/Arturo O’Farill Quartet. Seeley, on trumpet, has toured, recorded and performed with Ray Charles, The Duke Ellington Orchestra, Lester Bowie’s Brass Fantasy, The Machito Orchestra and Greg Allman and friends, and is a featured soloist with the Chico O’Farrill Afro Cuban Big Band. Pianist Arturo O’Farrill created the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra and founded the Afro Latin Jazz Alliance. He has performed with Wynton Marsalis, Paquito D’Rivera, Dizzy Gillespie and many others. Mary Lea Johnson Performing Arts Center, 433 West End Ave., 212-497-6528; 7 p.m., $5 to $10.

She’s the One—The group Those Indian Guys presents the Off-Broadway show D’Arranged Marriage, about an aspiring New Zealand Indian stand-up comic who spends his life working at his father’s corner shop and avoiding the issue of an arranged marriage. When his family finally gets the better of him, he is surprised to find that the prospective bride is the one. The one-man show is written, produced and performed by Rajeev Varma, and has sold out in New Zealand, Australia, Singapore and Malaysia. The Triad NYC, 158 W. 72nd St., 2nd Fl., 212-352-3101; 7 p.m., $20 to $30 plus two drink minimum.

Saturday, April 17

Graceful—Miro Magloire’s Chamber Ballet performs ballets by Magloire and Emery LeCrone. LeCrone’s ballet, “Chamber Dances,” is set to “Road Movies” for piano and violin, by American composer John Adams. The second piece is a solo performed by Emily SoRelle Adams to “Anthemes” for violin, by Pierre Boulez. The performance will also include “Allegretto, Innocente,” set to two piano sonatas by Joseph Haydn and Magloire’s “Monologue,” set to music by American Composer Morton Feldman. City Center Studio 4, 130 W. 56th St., 212-868-4444; 8 p.m., $12 to $22.

Twain’s New York—To mark the centenary of Mark Twain’s death, as well as the great humorist’s decades-long relationship with New York City, Upper West Sider Peter Salwen, a writer and Twain expert, hosts walking tour “Mark Twain’s New York.” The two-and-a-half hour excursion includes many of Twain’s anecdotes and epigrams. It starts in Soho and ends at the site of the author’s last New York City home, at Fifth Avenue and East 9th Street. Also April 18. Meet at the southwest corner of Broadway and Spring Street, 917-620-5371; 1 p.m., $15.

Hungarian Playwright—The American Hungarian Library and Historical Society, along with The New York Hungarian Theatre and Art Association, present a staged reading of My Bed Is Not for Sleeping, a satirical comedy in two acts. Gerty Agoston, the playwright and novelist, has roots in Budapest and Wien and won awards for her monologue drama, My Killer, My Kid. She has published 13 novels in four languages. A buffet reception follows the performance. The American Hungarian Library in the Hungarian House, 212 E. 92nd St., 646-228-0050; 5 p.m., $15
suggested donation.

Bard Classic—The Frog and Peach Theater Company present Shakespeare’s Macbeth, directed by Lynnea Benson. The classic play depicts Lord and Lady Macbeth performing unspeakable acts when three strange witches appear with the promise of greatness. One murder leads to another in one of Shakespeare’s most popular tragedies. The West End Theatre, 263 W. 86th St., 2nd Fl., 212-868-4444; 7:30 p.m., $18.

Sunday, April 18

Fairytale—Limecat Family Theatre Company presents The Princess and the Frog Prince, a play written and directed by Denise Devin, with original music and lyrics by Christopher Reiner. When a forgetful Queen turns Prince Chris and his friend Bob into a frog and a mouse, they discover that only a kiss from a princess will break the spell. Children are invited to get autographs and pictures taken with the actors after the show. Actors’ Temple Theatre, 339 W. 47th St., 212-239-6200; 12:30 p.m., $20 to $40.

Yedidia’s Works—Merkin Concert Hall presents the annual celebration of composer Ronn Yedidia’s works, “21st Century Music & On.” Yedidia has created a repertoire of piano, chamber and symphonic works. The concert includes several world premieres, including “String Trio” and “Perspectives,” which combines written and improvised music and was written in honor of the 200th birthday of Frederic Chopin. The concert will also feature “DanzaNova,” a five-piece ensemble whose repertory stems from ethnic music originating in Central and Eastern Europe, the Middle East and Latin America. Merkin Concert Hall at the Kaufman Center, 129 W. 67th St., 212-501-3330; 7:30 p.m., $20 to $35.

Monday, April 19

Donate—The Kidney and Urology Foundation of America hosts a free conference, “Transplantation in the United States: The Shortage of Available Organs and Public Health Policy.” The seminar brings together a diverse panel of leaders in the subject, including David J. Cohen, Nancy Scheper-Hughes and Alex Tabarrok. Jonathan A. Winston, from Mount Sinai School of Medicine, moderates. Light refreshments are served. RSVP is required. The Paley Center for Media, 25 W. 52nd St., 732-866-4444; 6 p.m., Free.

Support the Chorale—The Collegiate Chorale presents Ted Sperling and Friends for its annual spring benefit. The event, featuring singers Santino Fontana, Alexandra Silber and Lauren Worsham, begins with cocktails and a light dinner, followed by champagne, dessert and a performance of Broadway and classical favorites. Students from the chorale’s “Side by Side” education program also perform, and guest auctioneer Jay Cantor leads a live auction. The Hudson Theatre, Millenium Broadway Hotel, 145 W. 44th St., 646-435-9052; 7 p.m., $300 to $1,000.

Tuesday, April 20

Care Strategies—The New York Society for Ethical Culture presents a special program, “Stories from the Bedside—End-of-Life Conversations, Choices and Planning.” The program includes panelist Jane Brody, a New York Times health columnist and author. Brody shares stories describing challenges and strategies for receiving good end-of-life care, and discusses frequently encountered difficulties and paths to achieving personal end-of-life goals. The program is followed by a reception and book signing. The New York Society for Ethical Culture, 2 W. 64th St., 914-907-6156; 6 p.m., Free.

Discount Shopping—Museum members enjoy “double discount days,” starting today. Get a head start on Mother’s Day shopping with a 20 percent discount on sculpture reproductions, decorative arts, jewelry, scarves, ties, accessories, books, stationery, prints and more. Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Ave., 800-662-3397; through May 2.

Hearing Loss Discussion—
Marcia Finisdore, an active member of the Hearing Loss Association of America, presents an interactive discussion, “Hearing Loss in the Workplace: Strategies for Success.” Finisdore shares personal experiences after having progressive sensorineural hearing loss. She now has bi-lateral cochlear implants. Refreshments are provided. Muhlenberg Library branch, 209 W. 23rd St., 212-769-4327; 5:30 p.m., Free.

Wednesday, April 21

Celebrate Earth—Dag Hammarskjöld Plaza hosts an Earth Day celebration. Environmental groups and elected officials present informative talks and displays. There will also be live music and healthy treats by a greenmarket chef. The event also launches the “Global Voices” exhibit of photographs and commentary on United Nations Millennium Goals for health, education and a sustainable environment. Dag Hammarskjöld Plaza, East 47th Street between First and Second avenues, 212-826-8989; 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Free.

Thursday, April 22

Get to Know the Hood—The Park West Neighborhood History Group and the Columbus-Amsterdam Business Improvement District sponsor “Upper West Side Odyssey: An Illustrated Thumbnail History From the Lenape Indians to the Present.” Jim Mackin, Upper West Side historian and founder of “Weekday Walks,” leads the historical journey. American Youth Hostel, 891 Amsterdam Ave., 212-666-9774; 6 p.m., Free.

Family Earth-Friendly Crafts—The Central Park Conservancy hosts an afternoon of crafts to celebrate Earth Day. Using recycled materials, participants can turn trash into treasure. Kids can create their own mini-container gardens using recycled household materials, compost from Central Park and a flower. All materials are provided. Chess & Checkers House, inside the park at 64th Street, 212-794-4064; 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Free.

New York State of Music—
The musicians of Lenox Hill perform “Chamber Music New York Style,” under the artistic direction of Soo-Kyung Park. The program includes pieces by Lukas Foss, George Gershwin and Antonin Dvorak. It also includes “Luminaria,” a piece by Kenji Bunch. A dessert reception with the artists follows the concert. Musicians include Jae-Hyuck Cho, Cornelius Dufallo, Sean Katsuyama, Wei-Yang Andy Lin and Sivan Magen. Temple Israel of the City of New York, 112 E. 75th St., 917-834-5399; 8 p.m., $10 to $20.

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