Canned soup linked to higher BPA levels

Written by Our Town on . Posted in Healthy Manhattan, Our Town, West Side Spirit.


Found in the can’s lining, BPA is associated with adverse health effects

canned soup BPA_optA new study from researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health has found that a group of volunteers who consumed a serving of canned soup each day for five consecutive days had a more than 1,000 percent increase in urinary bisphenol A (BPA) concentrations compared with the same individuals who then consumed fresh soup daily for five days. The findings were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

“Previous studies have linked elevated BPA levels with adverse health effects,” said Jenny Carwile, a doctoral student in the Department of Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health and lead author of the study. “The next step was to figure out how people are getting exposed to BPA. We’ve known for a while that drinking beverages that have been stored in certain hard plastics can increase the amount of BPA in your body. This study suggests that canned foods may be an even greater concern, especially given their wide use.”

canned soup BPA 2_optExposure to the endocrine-disrupting chemical BPA, used in the lining of metal food and beverage cans, has been shown to interfere with reproductive development in animals and has been linked with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity in humans. In addition to the lining of food and beverage cans, BPA is also found in polycarbonate bottles (identified by the recycling number 7) and dentistry composites and sealants.

The researchers note that the elevation in urinary BPA concentrations may be temporary and that further research is needed to quantify its duration.

Make it fresh  You can easily make fresh soup without opening cans. This white bean and vegetable soup is made with frozen spinach and easily stockable pantry items. Ingredients  2 cups dried navy beans   4 ounces (about 4 slices) bacon, diced   1 medium onion, diced (about 1 cup)   2 stalks celery, diced  9 cups water  1/2 teaspoon anise seed   2 fresh tomatoes, chopped   1/4 cup parsley, chopped   2 tablespoons parsley, minced   1/4 teaspoon salt  1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper   1/2 cup frozen chopped spinach, defrosted   2 clove garlic   1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil   1/2 tablespoon fresh lemon juice  Directions 1. Quick-soak the beans: Place beans in large saucepan, cover with water, and bring to a boil over high heat. Remove from heat, cover, and let sit for 1 hour. Drain and set aside. 2. Make the soup: In a large pot over medium-high heat, cook bacon until browned but not crisp. Add the onions and celery and sauté until translucent — about 5 minutes. Add the water beans, and anise seed. Bring to a boil, lower heat, and simmer, partially covered, for 30 minutes. Add tomatoes, minced parsley, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and pepper and continue to simmer, partially covered, until beans are tender — about 1 hour. 3. Place spinach, 1/4 cup chopped parsley, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, and remaining salt in the bowl of a food processor fitted with a metal blade and process until smooth. Set aside. Ladle the soup into bowls and top with 1 to 2 tablespoons of the spinach mixture. Serve with grated Parmesan cheese.

Make it fresh
You can easily make fresh soup without opening cans. This white bean and vegetable soup is made with frozen spinach and easily stockable pantry items.
Ingredients
2 cups dried navy beans
4 ounces (about 4 slices) bacon, diced
1 medium onion, diced (about 1 cup)
2 stalks celery, diced
9 cups water
1/2 teaspoon anise seed
2 fresh tomatoes, chopped
1/4 cup parsley, chopped
2 tablespoons parsley, minced
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 cup frozen chopped spinach, defrosted
2 clove garlic
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
Directions
1. Quick-soak the beans: Place beans in large saucepan, cover with water, and bring to a boil over high heat. Remove from heat, cover, and let sit for 1 hour. Drain and set aside.
2. Make the soup: In a large pot over medium-high heat, cook bacon until browned but not crisp. Add the onions and celery and sauté until translucent — about 5 minutes. Add the water beans, and anise seed. Bring to a boil, lower heat, and simmer, partially covered, for 30 minutes. Add tomatoes, minced parsley, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and pepper and continue to simmer, partially covered, until beans are tender — about 1 hour.
3. Place spinach, 1/4 cup chopped parsley, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, and remaining salt in the bowl of a food processor fitted with a metal blade and process until smooth. Set aside. Ladle the soup into bowls and top with 1 to 2 tablespoons of the spinach mixture. Serve with grated Parmesan cheese.

“It may be advisable for manufacturers to consider eliminating BPA from can linings,” said Karin Michels, senior author of the study.

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