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Classical Diary: Lorin Maazel Plays Violin, Barely; Carnegie Hall’s “Choral Classics”; The Met’s Carmen

Written by Jay Nordlinger on . Posted in Posts

Tuesday, Jan. 16: Lorin Maazel is in Carnegie Hall, for what must be the thousandth time–but he’s playing the violin. Now 70 years old, the acclaimed conductor is, in fact, making his Carnegie recital debut. Many moons ago he was a child prodigy, as both a violinist and a conductor. But he hasn’t played the [&hellip
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Classical Diary

Written by Jay Nordlinger on . Posted in Posts

Friday, Dec. 29: Some people are licking their chops over Kurt Masur’s impending departure–his tenure as music director of the New York Philharmonic ends next season. Me, I’m beginning to mourn. The old German stands accused of having an insufficiently wide repertory. This is ridiculous–his repertory is plenty ample–but even if it weren’t, what’s wrong [&hellip
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Musical Diary

Written by Jay Nordlinger on . Posted in Posts

Sunday, Nov. 21 In recital at Alice Tully Hall this afternoon is Christine Schafer, the great hope of lieder-singing. She is a German soprano, young but wise, who has studied with, among others, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau and the late, remarkable Arleen Auger (whom Schafer resembles in important respects). A couple of years ago, Schafer put out [&hellip
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Musical Diary

Written by Jay Nordlinger on . Posted in Posts

He opens with Brahms’ Variations on a Theme by Haydn, and something is wrong, desperately wrong. It is no good. Previn is usually superb in this music, but tonight he is indifferent, limp, uninspired. He and the orchestra are merely phoning it in. At one point, the orchestra gets horrifyingly tangled up–and in music so [&hellip
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The Classical Music Season Begins

Written by Jay Nordlinger on . Posted in Posts

Thursday, Sept. 30. The Metropolitan Opera opens with everyone’s favorite pair, Cavalleria Rusticana and I Pagliacci, a couple of verismo gushers centering on infidelity (the thematic mainstay of all opera). Pietro Mascagni did not produce much, but he scored big with Cav. Many who do not know the complete opera would recognize the "Intermezzo" for [&hellip
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