Mary-Louise Parker Shines in David Auburn’s Middling Proof

Written by Jonathan Kalb on . Posted in Posts, Theater

In the second act of David Auburn’s Proof is a sweet father-daughter exchange that turns suddenly, chillingly sour. Robert, a world-class mathematician at the University of Chicago who has been mentally ill and unable to work, explains with exuberant lucidity to his brilliant offspring Catherine that he’s had a major breakthrough; he’s spent the day [&hellip
[ read more... ]

Be the first to comment on this post

The Laramie Project Remembers Matthew Shepard, with Sanctimony

Written by Jonathan Kalb on . Posted in Posts, Theater

The Laramie Project By Moises Kaufman and the Tectonic Theater Project Among the many traps that our intensely politicized, media-glutted age has laid in the way of good art is the tendency to confuse fine intentions with fine results. We all–artists, the art public, even most critics–want to think of ourselves as sensitive, engaged human [&hellip
[ read more... ]

Be the first to comment on this post

Wake Up and Smell the Coffee, Eric Bogosian’s Latest Solo Work

Written by Jonathan Kalb on . Posted in Posts, Theater

Extreme Exposure Edited by Jo Bonney (TCG Books, 450 pages, $18.95) George Jean Nathan once said that critics shouldn’t bother denying their prejudices. They should just be up-front about them, explain the experiences that led to them and let readers decide whether they are justly held. In this spirit, I confess my longstanding prejudice against [&hellip
[ read more... ]

Be the first to comment on this post

A New Uncle Vanya

Written by Jonathan Kalb on . Posted in Posts, Theater

Uncle Vanya By Anton Chekhov Six years after he virtually showed up in Times Square in Louis Malle’s brilliant though somewhat misleadingly titled film Vanya on 42nd Street, Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya has become something of a regular visitor to New York. The last Lincoln Center Festival included a mostly good Uncle Vanya from the Gate [&hellip
[ read more... ]

Be the first to comment on this post

London Hit Copenhagen Comes to New York

Written by Jonathan Kalb on . Posted in Posts, Theater

Michael Frayn’s Copenhagen is written as a speculative reconstruction of a difficult 1941 reunion between two famous theoretical physicists, the German Werner Heisenberg and the Danish Jew Niels Bohr. No one really knows why Heisenberg, head of the German nuclear program, went to see his old mentor and friend, at considerable risk to both, in [&hellip
[ read more... ]

Be the first to comment on this post

Beth Henley’s Family Week and Anna Deavere Smith’s House Arrest

Written by Jonathan Kalb on . Posted in Posts, Theater

Family Week By Beth Henley (Closed) There are some theater artists, not many, whose work I’m always glad to see, even when it isn’t their best. Their presence, the mere fact that they are working, is happy news, and their ambition feels like a gift whether it’s realized or not. Strong, original vision tends to [&hellip
[ read more... ]

Be the first to comment on this post

A New American Buffalo

Written by Jonathan Kalb on . Posted in Posts, Theater

American Buffalo By David Mamet American Buffalo, David Mamet’s first two-act play, received mostly lukewarm reviews when it appeared in 1975. Within a decade–after several high-profile productions and a film starring Dustin Hoffman–it helped establish his international reputation. This play and Glengarry Glen Ross (written in 1983) were the works that ultimately changed many people’s [&hellip
[ read more... ]

Be the first to comment on this post

True West Returns

Written by Jonathan Kalb on . Posted in Posts, Theater

True West By Sam Shepard What we expect of Sam Shepard, erstwhile bad boy rock ’n’ roll wordsmith, has changed in fascinating ways since his first play, Cowboys, was produced by Theatre Genesis in 1963. For many years he was an exclusively downtown phenomenon, with a genius for plays that didn’t recall any his fans [&hellip
[ read more... ]

Be the first to comment on this post

Nicky Silver’s New One’s No Good; Reverend Billy’s Is

Written by Jonathan Kalb on . Posted in Posts, Theater

The Altruists By Nicky Silver Nicky Silver, who became an Off-Broadway sensation in the mid-1990s with such stylishly perverse plays as The Food Chain, Pterodactyls and Raised in Captivity, is turning out to be the textbook case of arrested adolescence in American playwriting. Two years ago, I was inclined to overlook the clumsy contrivances in [&hellip
[ read more... ]

Be the first to comment on this post

..