The Wood Reclaims Black Youth Culture

Written by Armond White on . Posted in Arts & Film, Posts

Turn Back The Hands of Hiphop Vinyl records are used as souvenirs of childhood in The Wood, linking memories of growing up in the 1980s to contemporary trials of friendship faced by three responsible young men. Reading the record label logos as they spin on a turntable is enough to make those artifacts numinous, to recall the time of [&hellip
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Twin Falls Idaho Disappoints

Written by Matt Zoller Seitz on . Posted in Arts & Film, Posts

Siamese Dream For a while, the quirky independent film Twin Falls Idaho is mesmerizing despite the fact that not much is going on, and a lot of the movie’s power comes from the simple image of the two heroes’ faces side by side, whispering in consultation while wearing chocolate-gray hipster suits. It’s a stark, poetic image, and not just because [&hellip
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Eyes Wide Shut’s Images

Written by Godfrey Cheshire on . Posted in Arts & Film, Posts

The Photographer’s Final Frames Every Stanley Kubrick movie came down to an image, or a set of them, searching for two things: its own meaning and an appropriate dramatic elaboration. The fact that both searches were, in any given film, seldom entirely successful has not diminished the power of his work; in fact, it has bolstered it, especially for those [&hellip
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Blair Witch’s Corruption

Written by Armond White on . Posted in Arts & Film, Posts

A Cinematic Wedgie “Kill it before it grows!” Bob Marley sang. I’m cringing at the puerile celebration of The Blair Witch Project. This home video by the Florida-based team Daniel Myrick and Eduardo Sanchez is the worst of this year’s movie offenses so far. Calling it a “movie” is a bothersome technicality (it’s been transferred to celluloid and is being [&hellip
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Pups

Written by Matt Zoller Seitz on . Posted in Arts & Film, Posts

An Important Movie You May Never See We live in a time when independent cinema means midlevel studio pictures those studios can no longer be bothered to make; postmodern genre films that steal from other postmodern genre films; films about posers and street hoods and poser street hoods; films about people who just graduated from college and have to get [&hellip
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Blair Witch Scares

Written by Godfrey Cheshire on . Posted in Arts & Film, Posts

Witch Reality Smart, low-budget and appealingly ragtag, Daniel Myrick and Eduardo Sanchez’s The Blair Witch Project is something I’ve been looking for for 20 years: a horror film that doesn’t depend on ostentatious gore or special effects. Relying on several unusual strategies for fright, it’s one of those films you’re sure to enjoy more the less you know about it [&hellip
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Kubrick: The First Film Nerd

Written by Armond White on . Posted in Arts & Film, Posts

After the July 11 screening  of Lolita, both the Museum of Modern Art and the Anthology Film Archives concluded their early career tributes to Stanley Kubrick. These mini-fests are part of what TheNew York Times has described as mounting expectation for this week’s opening of Eyes Wide Shut. But seeing Kubrick’s 1956 racetrack thriller The Killing for the first time [&hellip
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Autumn Tale

Written by Godfrey Cheshire on . Posted in Arts & Film, Posts

Autumn Tale directed by Eric Rohmer   A French Harvest Autumn Tale, the last in Eric Rohmer’s “Tales of the Four Seasons,” is, like so much of the director’s work, a film that’s at once stunningly lovely on the surface and astonishing for its depths. Given that, it will be to the taste of a only small fraction of [&hellip
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An Ideal Husband

Written by Armond White on . Posted in Arts & Film, Posts

An Ideal Husband directed by Oliver Parker   Culture’s End Riding a bus to the Hamptons, a friend recently watched An Ideal Husband, on video. So did I—but in a theater. An oddly appropriate experience, since Oliver Parker conducts this adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s love roundelay just as a tv director would: mostly closeups and perfunctory medium shots for [&hellip
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