CHRISTMASTIME FOR NAZIS

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Spoiler Alert: Tom Cruise’s Col. Claus von Stauffenberg of Germany’s Tenth Panzer Division does not kill Adolf Hitler in Valkyrie. Although director Bryan Singer and screenwriters Christopher McQuarrie and Nathan Alexander devote the film’s plot to dramatizing von Stauffenberg’s historically correct plan, they get no deeper than telling audiences what they already know. Singer’s approach [&hellip
[ read more... ]

3 Comments

REVOLUTIONARY ROAD

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

As The Wheelers, a perfect-seeming, golden-blond, white American middle-class married couple in Revolutionary Road, Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet press all the high-drama buttons, yet they don’t resemble anyone anybody actually knows. Their marital problems, based on each person’s sulky personality—Frank’s a restless philanderer, April’s a frustrated artist, they’re both jealous of each other—could fill [&hellip
[ read more... ]

23 Comments

THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

It takes almost three hours for The Curious Case of Benjamin Button to wind down and approximate the climax of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. Kubrick’s fascinating image of a gigantic embryo floating in space and contemplating the Earth—then the audience—combined absurdity and magnificence. All mankind’s historical experience and scientific knowledge was distilled to [&hellip
[ read more... ]

11 Comments

YES MAN

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Most of the year-end movies look terrible after the Frank Borzage DVDs. The serious films repulse. The entertainment films bore. Even Jim Carrey misfires with Yes Man by playing Carl Allen, a depressed cynic who listens to a motivational speaker (Terence Stamp) then decides to embrace every life opportunity. Carl’s new ethic is exploited by [&hellip
[ read more... ]

32 Comments

SEVEN POUNDS

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Will Smith must be cinema illiterate. Maybe that’s why he frowns throughout Seven Pounds. A glib, charming movie star—but resourceless actor—Smith must think scrunching-up his face and looking worried for two hours shows serious concentration and emotional gravity. Apparently, he is unaware of the ways that movies and movie stars communicate depth and sincerity. Seven [&hellip
[ read more... ]

3 Comments

THE WRESTLER

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Hype for Mickey Rourke in The Wrestler is an embarrassment; the excellent actor has had greater roles and given more interesting performances (his tabloid exploits notwithstanding). As a middle-aged, small-time wrestler living in a New Jersey trailer, Rourke’s Randy “Ram Jam” Robinson tells his estranged daughter, “Now I’m an old, broken-down piece of meat, and [&hellip
[ read more... ]

4 Comments

CHE

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

“How does it feel to be a symbol?” Benicio del Toro is asked in his role as Che Guevara. “Of what?” he replies and is told: “The revolution.” But in Che, Steven Soderbergh’s two-part art thing, this revolution is about style—not politics. After decades as a poster boy for counterculture hipness, Che Guevara provides Soderbergh [&hellip
[ read more... ]

Be the first to comment on this post

THE READER

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Harvey Weinstein and the ghosts of producers Sydney Pollack and Anthony Minghella are hoping everyone this holiday season will want to see The Reader’s love story about former S.S. guard Hannah Shmitz (Kate Winslet) and the teenage boy she sexually initiates in the late 1950s and the cloud of remorse it casts over his adult [&hellip
[ read more... ]

20 Comments

DOUBT

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Religion has taken a beating in the current political climate, so John Patrick Shanley puts his Broadway play Doubt on screen pragmatically—as a showcase for our most revered, grandstanding actors. Meryl Streep and Philip Seymour Hoffman play Sister Aloysius Beauvier and Father Brendan Flynn who, in the early 1960s, butt heads at The Bronx’s St. [&hellip
[ read more... ]

16 Comments

IF YOU LIKED IT, THEN YOU SHOULDA PUT A WIG ON IT

Written by admin on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

It’s Obama time and black artists still suffer segregation. How else to explain the Gotham Independent Film Awards ignoring Cadillac Records, the most excitingly performed American movie this year? Cadillac Records tells a story of black popular music—its rapidly changing phases during the 1950s from the blues to race records, from rock ’n’ roll to [&hellip
[ read more... ]

1 Comment

..