The Road to Israel

Written by Doug Strassler on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Zaytoun strains for peace Let’s get it out of the way: Zaytoun certainly means well. Eran Riklis’s film, about the unlikely bond forged between a young Palestinian orphan and an Israeli pilot in wartorn Beirut circa 1982 is a promising premise that only bears the best of intentions about overcoming conflict. As a work of [&hellip
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Daddy Issues

Written by Doug Strassler on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Niels Arestrup is one bad dad in You Will Be My Son By Doug Strassler There is something so calming about French films – the lush countryside vistas, the way men wear tailored suits to all occasions that somehow still let them breathe, the glass of wine that seems to always be at hand regarless [&hellip
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For Ziad Doueiri, the Political is Also Personal

Written by Doug Strassler on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Director Ziad Doueir, photo courtesy Cohen Media Group Writer-director discusses The Attack By Doug Strassler Successful doctor Amin Jaafari (Ali Suliman)’s life as he knows it ends almost as suddenly as that of his wife’s, a victim of a suicide bombing who emerges as its perpetrator in The Attack, directed by Lebanese filmmaker Ziad Douieri, who also adapted the film from Yasmina Khadra’s [&hellip
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Augustine

Written by Doug Strassler on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Photo courtesy Music Box Films Alice Winocour’s debut marks a very suitable case for treatment By Doug Strassler We first meet Augustine - a kitchen servant, the title character of director-writer Alice Winocour’s impressive debut feature – in the middle of a major fit while working a very highbrow dinner. It’s a convulsion so severe I expected her character to die. [&hellip
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Every Day They Write the Book: Francois Ozon’s In the House

Written by Doug Strassler on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Photo courtesy Cohen Media Group The French film is part social commentary, part unabashed soap opera It’s always nice to see a work of art that values the art of creation – particularly the act of observant writing. Such is the case with In the House, the latest satire-cum-thriller from French auteur François Ozon. Adapting Juan Mayorga’s play, House is [&hellip
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God is the Bigger Auteur

Written by Armond White on . Posted in Arts & Film, Arts Our Town, Arts Our Town Downtown, Arts West Side Spirit, Film, Our Town, Our Town Downtown, West Side Spirit

Cristian Mungiu goes for the bogus In God is the Bigger Elvis, about former movie actress Dolores Hart who gave up her Hollywood career opposite such glamorous stars as Elvis Presley, Montgomery Clift, Stephen Boyd and is now Mother Prioress at the Regina Laudis Benedictine abbey in Bethleham, Conn., director Rebecca Cammisa touches upon faith, [&hellip
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Cold Case

Written by Doug Strassler on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

Silence Misery finds plenty of company in ‘The Silence’ The trouble with tragedy is that it is harder than one might think for it to elicit emotion from a third party. Sometimes, an audience remains at a distance despite the harrowing event befalling the characters in front of their eyes. And so it goes with The [&hellip
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Number One With a Bullet

Written by Armond White on . Posted in Arts & Film, Film

AN EXCLUSIVE CITYARTS CRITICS DISCUSSION OF WALTER HILL’S COMEBACK Bullet to the Head is an event. It is director Walter Hill’s first theatrical film since 2002’s Undisputed and the most meaningful Sylvester Stallone acting vehicle since Rocky. On this occasion, I discuss the significance of Bullet to the Head with CityArts film critic Gregory Solman, [&hellip
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