The Fire Last Time: Post-civil rights black politics

Written by Norman Kelley on . Posted in Books, Posts

Black Political Organizations in the Post- Civil Rights Era is a slim but worthwhile collection that examines the role of the country’s leading black organizations in the post-civil rights era. Published by Rutgers University Press, its general diagnosis is that organizations like MLK’s SCLC, NAACP, CORE and the Urban League have floundered in the last [&hellip
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The Days After: Two small books on the meaning of September 11.

Written by Christopher Carbone on . Posted in Books, Posts

The collapse of the towers was a fiery crush of stone and steel, a scene that Hollywood directors–and average Americans–had imagined for years. For a few weeks after the attacks, I wore a flag pin on my lapel, and could not fathom attempts to explain 9/11, nor even to place it into an historical context. [&hellip
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Revisiting four famous assassinations.

Written by None - Do not Delete on . Posted in Books, Posts

Revealing Secrets Americans tend to be ignorant of history, particularly American history. The public has been conditioned to dismiss any domestic event labeled a “conspiracy theory” while simultaneously blindly accepting plots against the Republic involving such unlikely allies as the secular dictatorship of Saddam Hussein and the militant fundamentalists of al Qaeda. With the release [&hellip
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An ex-Republican senator reflects on an interesting career.

Written by None - Do not Delete on . Posted in Books, Posts

Indie on the Hill JIm Jeffords was in town March 9 on invitation from the New York Society for Ethical Culture. The independent senator from Vermont earned a standing ovation for a talk on “Rethinking Our National Priorities,” a subject given serious ink in his new memoir, An Independent Man. During the Q&A, he twice [&hellip
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Re-shading the history of baseball’s color line.

Written by None - Do not Delete on . Posted in Books, Posts

Shades of Grey Most fans have long regarded Brooklyn as the birthplace of integrated baseball. It was at Brooklyn’s old Ebbets Field, after all, that Jackie Robinson made his historic 1947 debut as the first black player in major league baseball history. Yet a full decade before the legendary second baseman donned Dodger blue, an [&hellip
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Bagman’s Lament: A former Chicago mob cop digs up the bodies.

Written by Deborah Lynn Blumberg on . Posted in Books, Posts

For 30 years, Mike Corbitt was the Chicago mob’s handpicked police chief in Willow Springs, a corrupt Chicago suburb where whorehouses and casinos operated with impunity. It was a great place to dump bodies. From the 1960s to the 1980s, Corbitt also acted as an enforcer and bagman for Sal Bastone, a powerful Chicago mobster. [&hellip
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Keith Blanchard goes high-brow.

Written by None - Do not Delete on . Posted in Books, Posts

Are You suprised ? Last Summer, Maxim editor-in-chief Keith Blanchard addressed the Columbia School of Journalism with a talk entitled “How Maxim Saved Journalism.” The bizarre speech, which, sadly, was not followed up by a sequel called “How Maxim Saved Christmas,” defended the famous lad mag from accusations of anti-intellectualism. Taking a cue from Elvis, [&hellip
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Norman Solomon’s new book criticizes, but does little else.

Written by None - Do not Delete on . Posted in Books, Posts

Let me just say this at the outset: I like Norman Solomon. I’ve been a faithful reader of his Media Beat column on the FAIR (Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting) website for many years now. Apart from Pro Football Weekly and the lukeford.com porn newsletter, it’s probably my favorite periodical read. He’s like the Mel [&hellip
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The Frozen-Water Trade

Written by Stacy Spencer on . Posted in Books, Posts

"For minds highly excited and in great activity there is no Sunday," wrote Frederic Tudor, the 19th-century "Ice King" who got rich selling ice when it was still considered a free commodity. America specializes in ambitious, greedy, obsessive men, driven by a single idea (think Henry Ford, Donald Trump, Ronald Reagan). Understanding the type goes [&hellip
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