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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24


(THEATER)
WHERE WOMEN DARE TO TREAD
Treading the line between danger and humor, 10 Plates explores the heartbreaking and ridiculous elements of everyday fears faced by women. Performed by the five-girl troupe Ex.Pgirl, expect to see dancing security guards, fighting bears and snow pants. Premiering today and continuing through Sunday at Here, 145 6th Ave. (betw, Spring and Broome Sts.), 212-352-3101; $15.

(FESTIVAL)
ALL TOGETHER, NOW
Kicking off today and running through Nov. 17, the unabashedly eclectic Crown Point Festival is the only event out there with the balls to combine DJs and mockumentaries with a film about the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. Abron Arts Center, 466 Grand St. (at Pitt St.), 212-352-3101; crownpointfestival.org.

(FILM)
BAMcinématek’s annual showcase of contemporary French cinema includes the New York premiers of five films. Wednesday’s Very Well, Thank You (director Emmanuelle Cuau in attendance) follows a likeable everyman lost amidst a faceless bureaucracy. Thursday’s film, Demented—adapted from a Timothy Findley novel—shows a family’s collapse through the eyes (and fertile imagination) of its youngest member. The series’ only documentary, Friday’s Je t’aime...moi non plus: Critics and Artists investigates the relationship between the film industry and film critics through interviews conducted at Cannes. A panel discussion with several film critics will follow the 6:50 screening. On Saturday, Anna M. (whose director Michel Spinosa will attend) presents the disturbingly intimate portrait of a mental patient who becomes hopelessly obsessed with her doctor. The series closes on Sunday with The Betrayal, which delves into France’s endemic racism by way of a group of French soldiers in Algeria in the 1960s.Oct. 24-28. BAM Rose Cinemas, 30 Lafayette Ave. (betw. Ashland & St. Felix), B’klyn, 718-636-4100; $7.50-$11. (Benjamin Sutton)

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25

(JAZZ)
DRUM N BASS
Two generations of improvisers meet in one extraordinary evening of multimedia spectacle. Septuagenarian trombonist Roswell Rudd pairs up with Mark Dresser, a veteran of the Los Angeles free jazz scene of the early 1970s. Next up is Wildflowers, the duo of percussionist Adam Rudolph and Oguri, America’s leading Butoh artist, in an improvisatory dialogue of dynamics and motion. Roulette, 20 Greene St. (betw. Canal & Grand Sts.), 212-219-8242; 8, $15.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26

(HALLOWEEN-THEMED MUSICAL BONANZA)
MONSTER MASH
Heavy Weather is Soul/Jazz/Rock, and the Octomen are Surf, but Witches in Bikinis, they are Theatrical Pop/Rock, and, like that Halloween store that opens once a year, this is their time to shine. Kenny’s Castaways, 157 Bleecker St. (at Thompson St.), kennyscastaways.net; 7:30, $tbd.

(FILM)
THE EXORCISTS
Abomination: Homosexuality and the Ex-Gay Movement profiles the journeys of four gay Christians as they attempt to “exorcise” their homosexuality by following the treatment protocols of the “ex-gay ministries.” We won’t give away the endings, but suffice it to say this is tragicomedy of the highest order. The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center, 208 W. 13th St. (betw. 7th & 8th Aves.), 212-620-7310; 7:30, $10.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27

(PARTIES)
COSTUME-A-RAMA
Since Halloween falls on a Wednesday this year—more boo-hoo than boo!—you’ll have to get your grooves on a little early. GalleryBar (a maniacal hybrid of gallery and bar) is hosting its first annual Costume Ball this year, and it’s our pick for early-Halloween party spot for the year. Winner of the best costume contest drinks for free all night. GalleryBar, 120 Orchard St. (betw. Rivington & Delancey Sts.), 212-529-2266; 9, $10 (free with RSVP).

NIGHT FLIGHT
Climb aboard the haunted “Ship of the Dead” and hang with gargoyles, ghosts, goblins, dead sailors, vampires and other scary things you wouldn’t want your kids to see. It’s enough to make your skin crawl—in a party-on-a-boat-leaving-from-a-museum sort of way. South Street Seaport, Fulton St. (at Front St.), 212-748-8786. The ship sets sail at 6,7,8 & 9. $15-$20. Reservations required.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28

(SCAVENGER HUNT)
IT SCARES A VILLAGE
Not for kids under age seven, the Halloween edition of the Watson’s Adventure—an increasingly popular Village scavenger hunt for families—will take on the haunted homes of Edgar Allen Poe and Mark Twain, bats on a building, Dickensian doorknockers, Harry Potter's nemesis and a gorilla in a window. Call 877-GO-HUNT for location and reservation; 6, $20.50.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29

(COMEDY)
WILD AND CRAZY GUYS
The parallels between the Franco and Billy Show and Monty Python are undeniable. They are both sometimes surreal, sometimes historical, and sometimes completely incomprehensible. They toss film clips, music and sketch comedy into a single puke-colored but delicious stew. Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre, 307 W. 26th St. (betw. 8th & 9th Aves.), 212-366-9176; 8, $8.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30

(ROCK HISTORY)
SLASH ON SLASH
The polysyllabic, understated coverline for Slash’s new autobiography, Slash—co-written with someone else, of course—goes like this: “It seems excessive, but that doesn’t mean it didn’t happen.” That is a little like saying, “Satan is kind of a dick.” Whether Slash himself will be at the reading or just the guy who helped him write the books is unclear. Astor Place Barnes & Noble, 4 Astor Place, 212-420-1322; 7, free.

ONGOING

(THEATER)
GIRLS WILL DO GIRLS
A stage adaptation of Ann Bannon’s groundbreaking lesbian pulp fiction of the 1950s and 1960s, The Beebo Brinker Chronicles, written by Kate Moira Ryan, follows the lives and loves of Laura, Beth and Beebo as they navigate uncharted territories of desire. Through Oct. 28 at The Fourth Street Theatre, 83 E. 4th St. (betw. Bowery & 2nd Ave), 212-352-3101; $20.

BRAVEST, MEANEST
Travel back to the gritty days of pre-Giuliani New York: 1848, when Canal Street was a festering canal and rents were dirt cheap. A Glance at New York, written in 1848 as a contemporary vaudevillian entertainment, follows a burly firefighter named Big Mose. Known as the toughest man in the nation’s toughest city, Mose spends much of his time beating everyone in his path, finally seeking redemption by rushing off to rescue a screaming innocent from a burning tenement. Through Nov. 17 at Axis Theatre, 1 Sheridan Sq. (just off 7th Ave.), 212-352-3101; $20.

EEKS AND CREEPS AND CHILLS AND…
Hold your breath but don’t cover your eyes: The Shortened Attention Span Horror Festival is in town. Running every weekend through Oct. 28, five very short plays guaranteed to scare the pants off even the most jaded theatergoers. Each week the audience will select a favorite with the three winning short horror plays to be presented on Halloween. The Players Theatre and Loft, 115 MacDougal St. (betw. W. 3rd St. & Minetta Ln.), www.theatermania.com; Thurs.-Sat. 8; Sun. 3, $17.

(ART)
BRINGING IT HOME
On display through Oct. 28 in Long Island City overlooking the New York skyline, Takashi Horisaki’s Social Dress New Orleans: 730 Days After is an awesome, eerie spectacle: a full-scale latex replica of a demolished Lower Ninth Ward shotgun-style home. Socrates Sculpture Park, 3201 Vernon Blvd. (at Broadway), socratessculpturepark.org. On display seven days a week, 10am-sunset; free.

EARLY STELLA
Through Nov. 17, five rarely seen paintings by American master Frank Stella. Culled from an early but pivotal phase in his development (1958-1965) they include “Your Lips Are Blue,” which is one of only two such paintings with text that still exist. Also on display: “Bafq,” an exotic dazzle of mixed orange, green and purple bands named for an ancient Iranian city. Peter Freeman Gallery, 560 Broadway (betw. Prince and Spring Sts.), 212-966-5154. Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm.

(ART OF ICK)
Michael Whittle’s very finely wrought, somewhat icky pencil drawings are reportedly inspired by a Dylan Thomas poem. We don’t see it. What we do see is an almost scientific approach to imaginary organic or natural forms, like the blueprints for props in a David Cronenberg flick. “Cloud, Gland, Tributaries,” for instance, could be a river or a fleck of skin magnified a thousand times. Either way, you’ve been warned. The one-man show runs through Oct. 27. Daniel Cooney Fine Art, 511 W. 25th St. (betw. 10th and 11th Aves.), 212-255-8158. Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm.

(PHOTOGRAPHY)
THE WRETCHED AND THE RADICAL
Since his immigration here from Canada in 1979, photographer Clayton Patterson has been a dedicated chronicler of the hippies, hipsters, outcasts and in-crowds that have made the Lower East Side arguably the most storied nabe in the city. The first ever gallery exhibition of his photographs—they could be seen only in published anthologies and at this own Essex St. studio—is on display now, until Oct. 27 at Kinz, Tillou and Feigen, 529 W. 20th St. (betw. 10th and 11th Aves.), 212-929-0500. Call for hours.

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